Upcoming Concerts in 2019

 
 

Wednesday 6th November 2019, 4pm

Teatro Di Noto, Sicily, Italy
Martin Randall Travel

L’Issipile (1723) – Francesco Conti

Christopher Turner Toante
Lucy Crowe Issipile,
Katie Bray Eurinome
Mary Bevan Rodope
James Hall Giasone
 Gerald Thompson
Learco

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Employed for over 30 years at the Hapsburg court in Vienna, Francesco Bartolomeo Conti, originally from Florence, was one of the most gifted composers of his time. But there have been very few modern revivals of his works. The score of L’Issipile, Conti’s last opera, languished in the Austrian National Library until its first modern revival at Wigmore Hall in 2014 revealed its magnificence. Conti’s arias are richly contrapuntal, and there is an unusual abundance of orchestrally accompanied recitatives. The plot is based loosely on a story from Ovid’s Heroïdes and other classical sources: Jason and the Argonauts arrive on the island of Lemnos, where the women seem to have murdered all men in revenge for their adultery with Thracian women while away at war. Queen Hypsipyle falls in love with Jason, but a pirate suitor returns….

 


 

 

Saturday 9th November 2019, 7.30pm

Classical Women
Lucy Crowe Soprano

Assembly Rooms, Bath, UK
Bath MozartFest

Handel
Overture, Da tempeste & V’adoro pupille
 Giulio Cesare

Passacaille Rodrigo

Ah! Ruggiero crudel … Ombre pallide
 Alcina
Ah! mio cor 

Mozart
Al destin, che la minaccia Mitridate

Ah! se il crudel periglio Lucio Silla

Minuet Serenade in D major K 203

Dove sono Le nozze di Figaro

Allegro Eine kleine Nachtmusik K 525

Come scoglio Così fan tutte

S’altro che lacrime La Clemenza di Tito

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“Lucy Crowe dazzles with her every appearance, a young singer blessed with look-at-me-and-listen charisma.”

Praise from the Sunday Times for a soprano who is equally at home in the Baroque period and in the Classical era – as this programme of well-known arias from the operas of Handel and Mozart will assuredly demonstrate. David Bates and his period-instrument ensemble La Nuova Musica, who brought last year’s Mozartfest to a memorable end with Haydn’s Creation, provide accompaniments and orchestral interludes.

 


 

Tuesday 12th November 2019, 7.30pm

Classical Women
Lucy Crowe Soprano

St John’s Smith Square, London, UK

Handel
Overture, Da tempeste & V’adoro pupille
 Giulio Cesare

Passacaille Rodrigo

Ah! Ruggiero crudel … Ombre pallide
 Alcina
Ah! mio cor 

Mozart
Al destin, che la minaccia Mitridate

Ah! se il crudel periglio Lucio Silla

Minuet Serenade in D major K 203

Dove sono Le nozze di Figaro

Allegro Eine kleine Nachtmusik K 525

Come scoglio Così fan tutte

S’altro che lacrime La Clemenza di Tito

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“I try to place all of our programmes into a modern-day social context: here, I wanted to explore how 18th Century representations of women might resonate with contemporary thinking. The result is a sequence of arias sung by characters who are powerful, vulnerable, intelligent, ambitious and sexy from the operas of Mozart and Handel – Cleopatra, Fiordiligi, Aspasia, Rosina Almaviva. Lucy Crowe (soprano) is our soloist; an artist who embodies all of the traits of the Prima Donna.

David Bates

 


 

Friday 20th December 2019, 7.30pm

Christmas Festival – Bach Magnificat and Cantatas

St John’s Smith Square, London, UK

Bereitet die Wege, bereitet die Bahn!  BWV 132
Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme  BWV 140
Magnificat in D major BWV 243 

Anna Dennis Soprano
Miriam Allen Soprano
Patrick Terry Alto
Nick Pritchard Tenor

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Following the mystery and soul searching of Advent, The Church longs for the birth of its Saviour, Jesus Christ. The Magnificat is the song of Mary – Jesus Christ’s mother, who tells the news of His longed-for arrival. With Baroque contrast at its heart, Bach’s Magnificat alternates grand choruses with intimate arias – excitable declamations with sensual invocations for the coming of Christ. Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme must be one of Bach’s favourite Advent cantatas. Much like the sensual duet, Et Misericordia in the Magnificat, Bach writes beautiful duets between the soprano and baritone that represent the union of the Church and Christ. The first movement of this cantata is as fine a Fantasy as Bach ever wrote; a rich orchestration, French rhythmic grandeur and a syncopated Allelujah that is the personification of anticipation.

Bereitet die Wege from 1715 in Weimar, is more austere in its musical language and alternates arias and recitatives, and was written for the fourth Sunday in Advent. The fiendish opening aria for soprano and obligato oboe paints the word Bahn (road) with an endless, winding melisma signifying the difficulties that we have to go through during our earthly lives – hopefully reaching happiness in eventual Death. The final aria in the cantata for alto and obligato violin is astonishingly beautiful in its depiction of the Baptismal water, and reminds the listener of their Birth into the Church.